Tag Archives: Brussels Griffons

A Fun and Easy Art Activity–Make a Playful Pug Picture

Pugs are playful, little lap dogs, but God created dogs with a huge amount of potential, enabling people to develop breeds to meet many needs from herding, guarding, and service to companionship. Today dogs come in more shapes, sizes, and abilities  than any other mammal species—over 300 recognized breeds worldwide, from tiny chihuahuas to huge Great Danes. Which breed is your favorite?

Mary Cassatt, the American Impressionist artist in my last post, loved little Brussels Griffon dogs, and sometimes added them to her paintings—often in people’s laps. Brussels Griffons were originally bred to hunt rats and mice in stables, but  breeders crossed the Brussels Griffons with other small breeds, including pugs, to create the lap dog you see in Cassatt’s work.

Young Girl at a Window by Mary Cassatt, public domain

Many think the Brussels Griffon looks like an ewok from Star Wars. The pug “force” is strong in that cute, mooshed-in griffon face, So our art activity this month is a fun mixed media art activity about a cute pug who’s asking a butterfly to play

In this post you’ll also find:

  • A list of the ways this activity can contribute to your children’s mental, physical, and social development
  • A list of curriculum connections

Supplies for the Pug

  • Colored paper in browns, tans, grays, black, white, red
  • Scrap paper to make patterns
  • Compass or various sizes of round lids to make circles
  • Pencil, scissors, and glue
  • Crayons or markers

Directions for the Pug (Except for the tongue, every body part begins with a circle)

  1. Using a compass or various round lids, draw a large circle for the pug’s body and a smaller circle for its head
  2. The muzzle or snout is a smaller circle from which you draw and cut a heart shape with the pointy end rounded off (see photo)
  3. The ears also begin as circles. (follow the photo to turn these into ears)
  4. You need two circles for the eyes, one a little bigger than the other
  5. The tail and paws are the same size circles. (follow the photo to make one into the tail)
  6. The nose is a small circle, trimmed to a rounded triangular nose shape
  7. The smallest circle is the white dot for the eyes
  8. The tongue is two straight parallel lines with one end curved
  9. Once you have the patterns made, cut the pug shapes out of the appropriate colors
  10. To get the white edge for the eyes, cut two moe eye circles out of white paper, and then cut each into a quarter moon shape
  11. Glue all the parts together, making sure to slip the eyes and the tongue under the muzzle before the glue dries
  12. Finish with crayon or marker details on paws, under nose, and above eyes

Supplies for the Garden Background and Butterflies

  • Sturdy white paper
  • Watercolor paints and brush
  • Crayons
  • Toothbrush
  • Various colored scraps for the butterflies

Directions for the Garden and Butterflies

  1. With crayons draw shapes for the flowers on the white paper. Press down with the crayons to make heavy lines, but don’t color the flowers in (see photo for shapes or make up your own)
  2. Mix puddles of water and paint and paint right over your crayon lines. Don’t worry if you go outside the lines
  3. Notice that the crayon lines still show (this is called crayon-resist painting)
  4. Let the flowers dry
  5. If you like the speckled look, mix up more watery paint and use a toothbrush to build up as much speckling as you like. You can use several colors.
  6. To make the butterflies, choose several colors and cut into small rectangles
  7. Fold the rectangles in half and draw half of the butterfly’s body against the fold. Then draw the upper and lower wings and one antenna
  8. Cut these out while still folded. Then flatten the body out and fold up each wing

Putting it all together

  1. Glue the pug onto the background garden
  2. Glue the butterflies where ever you’d like
  3. With green crayon draw blades of grass along the bottom, with some coming across the pug’s paws, so it looks as if he’s in the grass.

Now you have a cute pug who wants to play with the butterfly on his nose!

Helpful Hints:

  • Try the speckling on scrap paper first to see if you like it (to speckle, run your finger backwards along the bristles)
  • If you want to be really precise with painting the flowers, use less water, and a smallish brush. The crayon will help you stay in the flower shapes.

Hints for Clean Up:

Wax paper is helpful under things when you spread glue, because it doesn’t stick to the paper AND it keeps globs of glue off your table

Variations:

  • Use big googly eyes for the pug
  • Use colored paper for a background
  • Do a background of wet-in-wet watercolors, letting the paint swirl together

Ways this activity can contribute to your children’s mental, physical, and social development

  • Using crayons and scissors, and other art tools helps children develop fine motor skills.
  • Seeing how to use basic shapes to create a more complex form helps children be more observant.
  • Measuring and using a compass helps with math skills
  • Opportunities to make choices as in this activity, enhances problem-solving skills.
  • Discussing their choices as they work aids in vocabulary and conversational skills.

Curriculum Connections

  • Make a map showing where your favorite breed came from. Tell what it was bred to do.
  • Look up different dog sports, such as herding dog trials, fly ball, agility, etc. List all the words that describe how the dogs move in these sports, such as leap, scurry. See who can come up with the longest list.
  • Some dogs can sniff out diseases. Are certain breeds better at this? Write a report about how the dogs are trained.
  • How are dogs trained as guide dogs or as other service dogs? Make a poster of all the ways dogs help people as service dogs.

Before you leave:

  • Comment and tell us what dog breed is your favorite.
  • Be sure to sign up for my newsletter by clicking on the button at the top right of this post. You’ll get a free, downloadable Guide to Making Art Museum Visits a Fun Masterpiece for the Whole Family! Molly contributed some good ideas to the guide, too!
  • And you can visit my all new website to see the tings we’ve added to help you engage your children’s hearts and hands to discover God in art, history, and Nature.http://www.kathy-oneill.com/

Molly hopes you enjoyed making this cute pug picture. She was kind of disgruntled at first that it wasn’t a picture of her, but she came around.

And don’t forget to come back for our next blog—an interview with a children’s author, who has written a series of picture books about her rescue pugs! They are so cute, and we’ll interview her illustrator, too!

Thanks for stopping by. See you soon!