Wildflowers Seen on Summer Walks

This summer on our walks Molly and I are seeing lots of wildflowers. Clumps of blue flowers stand tall amid the grasses at the edge of paths. White daisy fleabane peeks out from under a bush and wild pink roses grow along a wooded stream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the fields orange paint brushes poke up their spikey heads, and yellow flowers like buttercups and dandelions shine like little pieces of the sun in many areas.

 

Albrecht Durer, a German artist who lived from 1471 to 1528, created beautiful oil paintings and was also one of the first to earn much of his living from printmaking. Take a look back at my post of November, 25, 2015, about his famous Praying Hands and his great interest in Martin Luther’s teachings.

A Large Piece of Turf by Albrecht Durer, public domain

But not everyone knows of his delight in studying and painting the small everyday creatures and plants where he lived, as well as on his many trips around Europe.

He had a great curiosity and appreciation for even the smallest parts of God’s creation! Here is one of those paintings, called the Large Piece of Turf. You’ll recognize the lowly dandelion!

Take time, as Durer did, to appreciate the beauty and intricacy of grasses, weeds and wildflowers that grow everywhere.

Get out and enjoy a walk in your neighborhood, a park, in the woods, or by the shore.

Even in your own yard, before you dig up that dandelion, notice that its buttery yellow mane shades to gold in the center. And marvel at God’s care in giving this lowly weed intricate little parachute seeds to ride away on the wind (probably to your neighbor’s lawn!)

 

Studies have shown that people are more creative after a walk AND come back refreshed and more aware of God’s creativity!

 

So take along a sketchbook or take photos of the flowers so you can continue to enjoy your own Piece of God’s Turf! Use it as wallpaper on your computer or phone for a time when you need refreshing. That picture will bring back the sights, the sounds, the scents, and maybe even the feel of a soft breeze of a relaxing time!

And as you walk and look, remember Matthew 6:28-34 where Jesus reminds us that if God has bestowed such care and beauty on the flowers of the field that are here today and gone tomorrow, how much more can we depend on Him to clothe and care for us.

What Piece of God’s Turf reminds you of His love and care? Is it a wooded area with dappled shade and the scent of pines? Is it at the sea shore where you can see sandpipers skittering away from incoming waves? Maybe you love meadows filled with yellow buttercups and Queen Anne’s lace.

One of my favorite Pieces of God’s Turf are the roadsides in upstate New York where orange day lilies and blue chicory mingle to provide a complementary-colored border all summer long. Join the conversation and share your favorite piece of turf.

Here’s Molly’s latest favorite piece of God’s Turf!!

 

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4 thoughts on “Wildflowers Seen on Summer Walks

  1. Cindy Sangenito

    Love this KathyMollyWildfowers post. I love to walk, but I think I’m reducing the intensity I need for cardiac benefit, because I seem to stop every 20 feet to take a picture. I love your blog, Kathy!

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    1. Kathy The Picture Lady Post author

      Thank you, Cindy! I do the same thing, but someone recently said it was actually better for you to walk or whatever briskly but include brief stops!! Sooo… I think we’re getting a double benefit–a good walk and refreshing stops to enjoy and appreciate God’s creation!!

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  2. Carol Duvall

    Hi Kathy, we just looked at your wildflowers blog and love it.Have you seen the movie Dare To Be Wild, a wonderful story about Mary Reynolds? I know that you and Wes would enjoy it. John and I just finished it. Hint: it is all about wildflowers and has a wonderful story woven in.
    Hope all is well.
    Blessings,
    Carol and John

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